I Could Be The Most Boring Trainer Around!!!

In today’s world of Athlete Training there is about as much variety as there are flavors of coffee at Starbucks! From the “Speed” training to Crossfit, training methods vary. When I take a look at websites and YouTube videos of training I seem to think my style and programming is really boring! I created a list of training types I don’t do.

1.) Crossfit- I don’t like it and its one of the worst training methods for young athletes. When technique is thrown out of the equation and numbers of reps are important, then it’s not for me.

2.) Speed Ladders- Good for proprioception, worthless for speed.

3.) Balance training- Great for rehabilitation, not that wonderful for strength, power or endurance. This is a big one for me. Risk vs. Reward. Does the benefit outweigh the risk of injury? You can see trainers having their athletes doing pushups on balance balls, standing on balance balls, military presses on Bosu Balls, etc. All of these exercises are a great way to injure your athlete without really reaping many benefits.


Here are the boring exercises I do program for my athletes.

1.) Olympic Lifts- the best exercise for any athlete. Creates power & strength.

2.) Plyometrics over hurdles and on top of boxes. My athletes don’t jump on balance balls or med balls. Again, I’m boring.

3.) Single limb movements- Single arm dumbbell bench press, not trying to max out on barbell bench every day. Lots of single legs squats & split squats, not maxing out on back squat each week either. Athletes move with one leg at a time (running, football linemen in a 3-point stance, etc.) why not train that way?

4.) Lots of stretching and prehabilitation- stretching is boring and it’s taking time away from throwing around a bunch of cool weight! Stretching is one of the most important parts of my programming. Athletes get tight from moving bad, lifting heavy weight at school without stretching beforehand and they get hurt during games and practice. Stretching helps reduce the stress and tension as well as prehab helping with mobility and stability.


I love to quote my idol and trainer Mike Boyle, “Be brilliant at the basics”. Be good at the small things and pay attention to detail. Don’t buy into the hype of the latest fads and gadgets. As a trainer I don’t try to reinvent the wheel. I don’t try to make up exercises. I just read, listen and educate myself from the ones who have come before me and have succeeded such as Mark Verstegen, Mike Boyle and Charlie Weingroff. These individuals are the ones have laid down the path for trainers to walk down.
So maybe it’s not that my programming is boring maybe I’m just focusing on the foundation and core of athletic movement?